BREAKING: Every Single ANTIFA Rioter From Charlottesville Just Got BAILED Out Of Jail… LOOK Who Paid For It!

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Sassy Liberty AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS – 

In a despicable act, a legal group known as Nexus Services has announced that it will pay the bond for counter protesters arrested in the violence that erupted in Charlottesville, Virgina.  Counter protesters were made up of groups such as Black Lives Matter and Antifa.

CEO Mike Donovan announced yesterday that the company would secure bail assistance for students and others involved in the leftist counter-protest movement against the self proclaimed white nationalists. He stated that the company’s intention is to help those short on funds so they are not prohibited from being able to freely exercise their civil rights as well as their rights to speak freely.

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Donovan said in a statement

“We respect the constitutional rights of the citizens of Charlottesville, particularly the young people rallying against hate who attend the University of Virginia.

We also know that many young people lack the money to secure and post bond. Nexus Services Inc. will help those counter protesting the neo-Confederate rally, particularly students, and get help them out of jail and home as soon as possible.”

The company also emphatically stated that it had no intention of helping secure bond for anyone in the public demonstrations found to be wearing masks in violation of the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871.

The Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871 (ch. 22, 17 Stat. 13 [codified as amended at 18 U.S.C.A. § 241, 42 U.S.C.A. §§ 1983,1985(3), and 1988]), also called the Civil Rights Act of 1871 or the Force Act of 1871, was one of several important Civil Rights Acts passed by Congress during Reconstruction, the period following the Civil War when the victorious northernstates attempted to create a new political order in the South. The act was intended to protect African Americans fromviolence perpetrated by the Ku Klux Klan (KKK), a white supremacist group.

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In March 1871, President ulysses s. grant requested from Congress legislation that would address the problem of KKKviolence, which had grown steadily since the group’s formation in 1866. Congress responded on April 20, 1871, with thepassage of the Ku Klux Klan Act, originally introduced as a bill “to enforce the provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment and for other purposes.” Section 1 of the act covered enforcement of the Fourteenth Amendment and was later codified, inpart, at 42 U.S.C.A. § 1983. Section 2 of the act, codified at 42 U.S.C.A. § 1985(3), provided civil and criminal penaltiesintended to deal with conspiratorial violence of the kind practiced by the Klan. Both sections of the act were intended to givefederal protection to Fourteenth Amendment rights that were regularly being violated by private individuals as opposed to thestate.

In addition, the Ku Klux Klan Act gave the president power to suspend the writ of Habeas Corpus in order to fight the KKK.President Grant used this power only once, in October 1871, in ten South Carolina counties experiencing high levels of Klan Terrorism. The act also banned KKK and other conspiracy members from serving on juries.

The bail assistance hotline is 434-688-0036 and Nexus has publically stated they will accept collect calls.

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