Carly Fiorina considering run as a Republican for President

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From sister site Fight for Votes

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Carly Fiorina is considering a run as President as a Republican. Her record is more of the mainstream wing of the Republican Party than the conservative. Her stances have alienated American technology workers and the industry as a whole. Her political record was an embarrassment to her campaign as a Senator in California. Running as President would drag these “demon sheep” out.

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Stances on the H1-B

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The H1-B visa is a way for companies to bring in foreign workers instead of using American ones. Fiorina wants it expanded and she has worked to influence Senator John McCain (R-AZ), especially during his run as President of the United States. Her ideas did not help win hearts and minds of the tech industry, media and workers.

Here, via SF Gate, is Fiorina’s comments and the reaction to them when she and former CEO of Intel testified before Congress in 2004.

Economists largely agreed with the high-tech industry’s outspoken defense of moving jobs to India and China but noted this time the principle applies to a group unaccustomed to losing their jobs to overseas competition: highly educated and highly paid white-collar workers in Silicon Valley.

Comments made in Washington on Tuesday by Carly Fiorina, CEO of Palo Alto information technology giant Hewlett-Packard, and Craig Barrett, chief executive of Santa Clara chipmaker Intel Corp., drew an unusually strong reaction from workers, who suggested the pair forfeit their own highly paid jobs to Chinese or Russian executives working for a quarter of their pay.

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Fiorina’s statement that “there is no job that is America’s God-given right anymore” triggered particularly strong reaction. The pair spoke in Washington representing the Computer Systems Policy Project, a group of eight chief executives from the nation’s top information technology firms.

They sought to head off rising protectionist sentiment in Congress by urging that the only way to protect U.S. high-tech jobs over the long haul was to become more competitive.

Warning that the U.S. lead in high technology is in serious jeopardy from competition from other nations, they outlined a long-term agenda to improve grade-school and high-school education, double federal spending on basic research in the physical sciences and form a national policy to promote high- speed broadband communications networks, as Japan and Korea have done.

The CSPP report, called “Choose to Compete,” states that the tech industry faces a serious competitive challenge from many countries abroad with highly skilled labor and increasing industrial sophistication, but it argues against protection. “Retreating from global competition is a certain prescription for failure,” the report said.

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The report says many new jobs will be available when the economy fully recovers, but it asks, “Who will land these jobs? Not the millions of American students who graduate from high school without basic reading, writing and mathematics skills. Not the astonishing number of American students — upwards of 25 percent — who drop out of school.”

But with unemployment at 7.2 percent in Santa Clara County in November, the latest figure available, Fiorina’s statement hit a sore spot.

“I am curious how Ms. Fiorina would feel about her job being outsourced to China or India,” Sean Ryan of Alameda, where the county unemployment rate is 6.1 percent, wrote in a representative e-mail to The Chronicle. “I am certain that there are many extremely bright, ambitious and successful executive types in those countries who would be able to do her job just as well if not better than she can at a cost savings to HP shareholders of millions of dollars per year.”

 

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