BREAKING: Here’s Who Just Took Out Convoy In MASSIVE Military Airstrikes- Here’s What We Know

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12 vehicles loaded with arms, ammunition and explosive material trying to cross the border from Libya were destroyed by Egyptian air strikes, according to an Army spokesman.

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The Air Force acted after hearing that “criminal elements” had gathered to try and cross the western boundary, the army statement said, without giving details on exactly where or when the strikes took place, Reuters reports.

The attacks came a month after Egypt launched a series of air raids in Libya on what it said were militants responsible for attacking Christians in its territory.

Twenty-nine Coptic Christians were killed in Egypt’s southern Minya province in May when masked men attacked their buses as they headed to a monastery. Daesh (ISIS) claimed responsibility.

Coptic Christians are Egypt’s largest minority group and violence against them has increased in recent months.

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The largest Christian community in the Middle East, Coptic Christians make up the majority of Egypt’s roughly 9 million Christians. About 1 million more Coptic Christians are spread across Africa, Europe, the United Kingdom and the United States, according to the World Council of Churches.

Coptic Christians base their theology on the teachings of the Apostle Mark, who introduced Christianity to Egypt, according to the St. Takla Church in Alexandria, the capital of Coptic Christianity.

The Coptic language descends from ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, according to the World Council of Churches. The word “Copt” is a Westernized version of the Arabic “qibt,” which is derived from the ancient Greek word for Egyptian, “Aigyptos.”

Hundreds of Coptic monasteries once flourished in the deserts of Egypt, but today roughly 20 remain, as well as seven convents, operated by more than 1,000 Coptic monks and about 600 nuns.

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