ISPs ARE NOT WHO ARE GIVING THE FEDS YOUR INFO PART 1

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Your internet service provider, cell service and regular phone service are not the people the federal government goes to when they violate the Fourth Amendment with FISA warrants. Instead, there are companies that take care of that without the actual provider knowing.

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The companies that fulfill FISA warrants

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Here, via ZDNet, are the companies federal law enforcement goes to gain your information.

By implementing these government data requests with precision and accuracy, trusted third-parties — like Neustar, Subsentio, and Yaana — can turn reasonable profits for their services.

Little is known about these types of companies, which act as outsourced data brokers between small and major U.S. ISPs and phone companies, and the federal government. Under the 1994 law, the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA), any company considered a “communications provider” has to allow government agencies access when a valid court order is served. No matter how big or small, even companies whose legal and financial resources are limited do not escape federal wiretapping laws.

Why must service providers give the info

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Here, via the Electronic Frontier Foundation, is why your communications are open to any law enforcement.

Are communications services providers legally obligated to assist law enforcement in carrying out communications surveillance?

Yes. Even before CALEA, federal law required communication service providers to assist law enforcement in carrying out the interception of communications (whether via telephone or computer network) by providing “all information, facilities, and technical assistance necessary to accomplish the interception unobtrusively.”

Indeed, there has been a long history of telecommunications carriers and service providers assisting law enforcement with surveillance. If law enforcement can meet the strict standards of Title III of the Omnibus Safe Streets and Crime Control Act of 1968, court orders permit them to intercept the content of communications (although under the PATRIOT Act, some wiretaps may be done with documentation less stringent than a court order), and communications service providers must comply with law enforcement in facilitating that interception of content.

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Law enforcement is now attempting to broaden CALEA by requiring communications service providers to design their networks to make it easy and fast for law enforcement to perform wiretaps, pen-register, and trap-and-trace surveillance on a large number of people. In other words, the FBI wants service providers and equipment manufacturers to design their networks to be surveillance-friendly from the ground-up and starting at the product design phase. CALEA would then serve as a technology mandate, imposing design or architecture duties upon communications technology itself to “guarantee” that surveillance will always be fruitful. This is a far cry from simply requiring communications service providers to assist law enforcement in retrieving information or content that is reasonably available given the current state of technology.

Your communications are not safe in any manner. This is by no means is what the founding fathers imagined

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