ALERT: Are You Planning On Flying This Holiday Season? You Might Change Your Mind After Seeing THIS

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When we jump on an airplane to travel to see family or go on vacation there is one thing we are counting on- our pilot! I mean, he is flying the plane right?

Well, a disturbing report reveals that many pilots are actually suffering from untreated depression and the reason why is absolutely terrifying!

These depressed pilots  fear being grounded or losing their jobs, a new survey suggests.

The anonymous survey of about 1,850 pilots from more than 50 countries found that 14 percent of pilots who had worked within the past week had symptoms of depression. Four percent of pilots reported having suicidal thoughts within the past two weeks.. according to AOL.

WHOA! That’s insane! 

“It’s understandable that pilots are reluctant to fully disclose mental health issues because of the potential that they will be grounded or declared not fit for duty,” senior study author Joseph Allen, a public health researcher at Harvard University in Boston told Reuters Health by email.

With roughly 140,000 active pilots flying more than 3 billion people worldwide each year, the survey results should put the airline industry on notice that many pilots need better access to mental health screening and treatment, Allen added.

The new findings come a year and a half after a Germanwings co-pilot who suffered from depression deliberately crashed a plane into the French Alps, killing 150 people.

To get a better picture of mental health among airline pilots, researchers conducted an anonymous online survey between April and December of 2015. Questions touched on a range of topics related to work and health in addition to depression.

Most respondents came from the U.S., Canada and Australia.

Out of nearly 3,500 pilots who participated in the survey, 1,848 completed the questions about mental health. Within this group, 233 (12.6 percent) met the criteria for likely depression and 75 (4.1 percent) reported having suicidal thoughts within the previous two weeks.

Among 1,430 participants who reported working as an airline pilot in the previous seven days at the time of the survey, 193 (13.5 percent) met the criteria for depression.


The study also found that depression was more likely when pilots took lots of sleep medication and when they experienced sexual or verbal harassment.

Limitations of the study include the lack of medical records or exams to assess mental health symptoms pilots reported in the survey, the authors note.

“The study likely underestimates the amount of depression that exists among pilots, however, it cannot address the severity of the symptoms and the extent of individual impairment,” Dr. Joseph Baskin, a psychiatrist at Cleveland Clinic in Ohio who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email.

Pilots may not tell their own doctors about feeling depressed because both having this diagnosis and taking antidepressants come with stigma and a fear of being grounded, said Dr. Blake Lollis, an aerospace medicine specialist at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital in Washington who wasn’t involved in the study.

Very scary.

Frankly, I refuse to fly anymore which means my days in Hawaii are done! I lived there for a year and it was great but I will stay grounded for the duration of my life.

Be careful out there patriots.

God Bless.



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