BREAKING: U.S. Just BOMBED This TERRORIST Country, At Least 4 DEAD- Here’s What We Know So Far

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Dean James III% AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS –

The U.S. has hit the Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) terror group in Yemen on Thursday with wide-ranging airstrikes that targeted the same general area where Navy SEAL William “Ryan” Owens was killed. This is the first military action in Yemen since that raid.

The Pentagon said in a statement that more than 20 early morning airstrikes, using a mix of manned and unmanned aircraft, were aimed at Al Qaeda fighters, equipment, infrastructure, heavy weapons systems and fighting positions in three south-central provinces suspected to have terrorist activity: Abyan, Shabwa and Bayda, Richard Sisk at Military.com reports.

The strikes will degrade the AQAP’s ability to coordinate external terror attacks and limit their ability to use territory seized from the legitimate government of Yemen as a safe space for terror plotting.

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At least four Al Qaeda fighters were killed, according to one Yemeni official.

It was in central and mountainous Al Bayda province on Jan. 29 that Owens, 36, of Peoria, Illinois, a member of Navy SEAL Team 6, was killed in what U.S. Central Command described as a “ferocious firefight” during a raid on an AQAP compound. The raid was personally authorized by President Donald Trump and resulted in the first combat casualty of his tenure.

In addition to Owens’ death, three U.S. troops were wounded in the attack on the AQAP compound and at least two others were injured in the hard landing of a Marine MV-22 Osprey supporting the mission. The $70 million Osprey could not be flown out and was later destroyed by a Marine AV-8B Harrier jet.

The White House and Pentagon have repeatedly described the raid as a success despite Owens’ death, in that the mission gathered valuable intelligence on AQAP’s activities and planned operations.

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One U.S. official told Fox News the intel gathered from the January raid “likely” provided information needed for the airstrikes overnight. Another official pushed back, saying it was not clear how much information from the January raid contributed to last night’s strikes.

Al Qaeda in Yemen, seen as the militant group’s most dangerous offshoot, has seized large swaths of land and entire cities since 2011, when a mass uprising forced longtime ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh from power.

However, the group grew in weapons and numbers after the start of the 2015 Saudi-led campaign that targeted Houthi rebels who seized control of the capital, Sanaa, forcing the internationally recognized government to escape.

Throughout the years, the U.S. has depended on drone strikes in hunting down Al Qaeda’s top leaders and operatives. In 2015, the group’s leader was killed in a drone strike in the southern city of Mukalla, the provincial capital of Yemen’s largest province of Hadramawt, and which fell into the hands of the group for a year.

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President Trump paid his respects to Senior Chief William “Ryan” Owens his address Tuesday night to a joint session of Congress.

“Ryan died as he lived. A warrior and a hero battling against terrorism and securing our nation,” he said. “Ryan was a part of a highly successful raid that generated large amounts of vital intelligence that will lead to many more victories in the future against our enemies.”

“Ryan’s legacy is etched into eternity. For as the Bible teaches us, there is no greater act of love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. Ryan laid down his life for his friends, for his country, and for our freedom. We will never forget him,” President Trump said.

Rest in peace Senior Chief William “Ryan” Owens. We thank you for your service and as President Trump said, we will never forget you.

God Bless.

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Dean James III% AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS

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